Puzzle.blog

Replacing Negativity With Gratitude

By Christian Staal

When something annoys you, find something to be grateful for. If you have an argument with your partner, be grateful for the relationship itself. If something frustrates you at work, be grateful that you have a job. Too often, we get upset by small things. Gratitude gives us perspective.

More:

James Altucher on CreativeLive (interview) by Chase Jarvis

The Power of Gratitude (puzzle.blog post) 

The Power of Gratitude

By Christian Staal

It often feels like happiness is waiting right around the corner (“If only I get that promotion”). However, if you can’t be happy with what you have, you won’t be happy with what you get. Gratitude can boost your happiness. Here’s a scientifically proven exercise you might enjoy: The next few weeks, pick a day, and write down three things you’re grateful for (aim for new things every week).

More:

The How of Happiness (book) Sonja Lyubomirsky, p. 88-91.

Academic articles:

  • R.A. Emmons og M.E. McCullough, “Counting Blessings Versus Burdens: An Experimental Investigation of Gratitude and Subjective Well- Being,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2003, 84, 377–389.
  • M.E. McCullough, S.D. Kilpatrick, R.A. Emmons, og D.B. Larson, “Is Gratitude a Moral Affect?” Psychological Bulletin, 2001, 127, 249–266
  • R.A. Emmons og C.A. Crumpler, “Gratitude as a Human Strength: Appraising the Evi- dence,” Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 2000, 19, 56–69

Emotions are contagious

By Christian Staal

When you see a happy person, some of the neurons in your brain react, as if you are experiencing happiness yourself. These are called mirror neurons, because they mirror the emotions of people around you. This is why yawning is contagious – as are feelings such as anger, joy and motivation. Who you spend your time with, influences who you become.

More:
Mirror neuron (Wikipedia)

How to Change a Habit

By Christian Staal

Habits consist of three elements:

  1. There’s a cue (for example, you feel hungry)
  2. You do a routine (you eat a cookie)
  3. You get a reward (you feel great)

The easiest way to change a habit, is to let the cue and reward stay the same – and find a new routine to connect them.

More:

The Power of Habit (book) by Charles Duhigg. This book explores the idea deeply.

Good Life Project: Charles Duhigg – Power of Habit (video interview) by Jonathan Fields

What do you carry?

By Christian Staal

Two Zen monks, Tanzan and Ekido, were walking, and saw a woman who was trying to cross a road. The road was muddy, and about to ruin the woman’s silk kimono. Tanzan picked her up, and carried her to the other side. The monks continued, and after five hours, Ekido asked “Why did you carry her across the road? We monks are not supposed to do things like that.” Tanzan smiled, “I put the woman down hours ago. Are you still carrying her?”

Do you still carry something from your past, which you ought to let go?

More:

Adapted from A New Earth (book, p. 139) by Eckhart Tolle

Let It Go (song) from Disney’s Frozen

The Subtle Power of Words

By Christian Staal

 

Words create emotions, which in turn influence behaviour. Let’s say you want to be more productive. Telling yourself I can’t watch TV all day long” makes you feel like you aren’t allowed to do what you really want. On the other hand, “I don’t watch TV all day long” frames it as part of who you want to be.

More:

I Have to Do It or I Want to Do It? (article, psychologytoday.com) by Timothy A. Pychyl

Why you should say “I don’t” instead of “I can’t.” (video) by Daniel Pink

Sharpen the Saw

By Christian Staal

Imagine a lumberjack who is cutting down a tree with a dull saw. “Sharpen the saw,” you tell him. “I’m too busy,” he says. Many people make the same mistake, when we fail to invest time in activities that increase our ability to be effective.

More:

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (book) by Stephen Covey

The Myth of Body Language

By Christian Staal

You have probably heard that 55% of human communication consists of body language, while voice and words account for 38% and 7% respectively. These numbers come from a study which has often been misinterpreted. The findings in the study don’t describe communication in general, but refer to talking about emotions in a specific way. However, the main message holds true: We shouldn’t underestimate the power of body language.

More:

  • TED Talks (book) by Chris Anderson (chapter 1).
  • Quote from Albert Mehrabian (the author of the study): “Please note that this and other equations regarding relative importance of verbal and nonverbal messages were derived from experiments dealing with communications of feelings and attitudes (i.e., like-dislike). Unless a communicator is talking about their feelings or attitudes, these equations are not applicable”. See more on Mehrabians website (bullet #5)

Bronze Is Better Than Silver

By Christian Staal

If you were an Olympian athlete would you rather win a silver or bronze medal? Most prefer silver, but – paradoxically – bronze medallists are often happier. Instead for focusing on not winning, they are just happy to be in the Top-3.

More:

Create Smaller Tasks

By Christian Staal

If you can’t get started with a task, it’s probably too big. Break it into smaller tasks, and it becomes easier to get going. For example, starting a business or getting in perfect shape are overwhelming undertakings. You don’t need to know everything in advance. Just find a small step that you can take today – and do it.

More:

« Older posts

Copyright © 2018 Puzzle.blog

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑